Zero Space Time - The Dark Corridor of Science

Afrasiabi Pre-force Theory: The Foundation of Future Scientific Theories

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International Journal of Innovative Research in Science, Engineering, and Technology (IJIRSET) | e-ISSN: 2319-8753, p-ISSN: 2320-6710| www.ijirset.com | Impact Factor: 7.512|

|| Volume 9, Issue 12, December 2020 ||

Kambiz Afrasiabi, M.D.
Associate Project Scientist, UCI

ZERO SPACE TIME - THE DARK CORRIDOR OF SCIENCE

I. ABSTRACT

Lack of understanding of the events preceding and culminating in Big Bang has affected all realms of science (Faber, 2001).
Relativity, which has revolutionized the world of science breaks down at initiation (Trevors, 2006).
This would discredit the most solid scientific theory, when it tries to describe the behavior of known universe in its true scheme (Einstein, 1920).
However it defines what we could see and measure in the most elegant way.
There is an urgent need for development of a new way of thinking, which would go beyond space time and reformulate the scientific description of universe (National Academy of Sciences, 1999).
Pre-force theory would offer such opportunity to us (Oriti, 2009).

II. INTRODUCTION AND BASIC CONCEPTS

We are the apparent residents of a world of numbers.

Since the time we are born, we are taught to measure everything in numbers (Corry, 2015). 

Our age, the distance between our home and school, the number of coins in our wallet.
The list goes on and on, and it reaches and hits our scientific theories. This, together with our instincts have led to formulation of current scientific theories and methodologies to solve our daily problems, and define the events of the world that we live in (Voit, 2019). 

As such, we have generated treatments that kill cancer cells even though we have seen their failure in front of our eyes. This is based on the instinct of killing to survive that we have inherited from our ancient
ancestors (Blumberg, 2017).
We have generated Big Bang theory, simply because it starts from a point called singularity, which is something that we could measure (Das, 2017).
This has become further complicated and supported by a firewall that exists in our neuronal network (Buckner and DiNicola, 2019).

This firewall does not allow us to penetrate and understand beyond the world of numbers (Marois &
Ivanoff, 2005).

Consequently, we can not understand nothingness in a deep scientific way (Rudnick, 2007).
We have not become able to go beyond Big Bang and identify its source (Overbye, 2001).
We have not become able to develop a cure for cancer while aiming at its destruction for the last 80 years
(Saltz, 2008).
We have not become able to traverse space time (Sidharth, 2014).
As such, we have continued to remain prisoners on this planet and in a tiny portion of this vast, cold, and dark universe.

To change all that, we need to develop and formulate scientific theories that could take us beyond space time and the current boundaries that rule our perception and theories (Kelly & Meerschaert, 2019). The big flaw in Big Bang theory is that it starts the known universe from singularity, a point that it can not define the origin of (Hawking & Ellis, 1973).

GUT or grand unified theory is supposed to get developed and reconcile the theory of relativity with quantum mechanics.

Even then, our theories will remain within a circle (Xu et al., 2019).
We still need to formulate a theory that goes outside of the box and could define the birth, if any, and behavior as well as destiny of the known universe which is sitting inside the box (Steiner, 2006).

We are facing the obligation of coming up with a new way of thinking. Zero space time is something we do not understand clearly at this time (De Haro & de Regt, 2018).

However we have put Big Bang at the center, as the origin of the known universe (Singh, 2004).
This is something that we understand and we can measure, but we can not define its source (Roos, 2012).
This has fed illusion into our minds and has led to build up of an empire that could fall apart in no time, in the presence of events that it could not foresee (Wollack, 2010).
Thus, I propose a pre-force, something that we have no idea about and is totally puzzling at this time, but could give birth to description of all measurable forces including Big Bang and Hawking Energy Density Radiation of Universe (Hawking, 1988).

This pre-force would give birth to space out of nothingness.

The exhaustion of this pre-force would lead to generation of infinity wall, when it can not generate space anymore (Kevrekidis et al., 2017).
Thus, the beginning and the end of the known universe are generated simultaneously, by virtue of preforce theory (Motz & Zeilik, 1975).
Reflection of the residual of pre-force at the border of infinity wall would convert into a measurable force that could generate Big Bang (Wall, 1988). Consequently, regular matter in known universe is born out of a Big Bang and perhaps many other big bangs at the border of Afrasiabi infinity wall (National Research
Council, 2001) (Figure I).

This happens through condensation of massive amount of energy into super strings following reflection at
infinity wall and would give birth to all known derivatives of matter, which has been well described in
current literature (Dine et al., 1985).

It is possible that we reside in a baby universe generated by one Big Bang, among many other big bangs inside one universe (Linde, 2017) (Figure II).
The way pre-force creates space could be exemplified to the way we inflate a balloon from its outside (Tenny & Cooper, 2020).

One could hypothesize that the stability of generated space is maintained by dark energy, which could be
the most immediate derivative of pre-force (Huterer & Shafter, 2018).

Quantum fluctuation of dark energy could be what we call dark matter (Bahcall, 2015a).
According to pre-force theory, the known universe is infinitely vast but endful and it could be only one of infinite number of other universes that are known as parallel universes (Ryan, 2006).
As such, the matrix of the known universe which is comprised of dark energy and its quantum fluctuation, dark matter would not expand following its birth (Turner, 2003).
However its content, ie: billions of galaxies move farther apart from one another, or expand from a central point and eventually would collide at infinity wall border and would go into big crunch before initiation of another round of Big Bang (Bahcall, 2015b). (Figures III and IV)

In this sense, Albert Einstein was right when he said universe does not expand, simply because the size of the stable balloon/ the known universe is maintained by dark energy and dark matter and it is the content of the balloon, namely billions of galaxies that are expanding before they eventually crunch (O’Raifeartaigh et al., 2017).

Space time comes into existence with the birth of photons which make measurable motion possible and this would change the identity of space into space time (Claridge et al., 2011).

Clearly, pre-force theory could reshape our understanding of the birth and behavior of the universe.
According to this theory, it is potentially possible for certain regions of the known universe to act as cosmic strings which lie outside of space time. (Figure V)
By the same token, trees of universe and endless forests of universes could come into existence by zero space time pre-force, and travel among the trees and forests of universes could become possible by finding access to cosmic strings related to known regions (Brihaye & Hartmann, 2008). (Figure VI)

III. Conclusion

It is expected that our future generation of scientists could access cosmic strings and make time travel a reality (Copeland & Kibble, 2010).

Pre-force theory might one day enable our future generations not only to discover intergalactic cosmic strings but also trans-cosmic strings (Sazhin & Sazhina, 2015).
As such, not only we could break the photonic walls of the prison that is incarcerating us in this dark and cold corner of universe, but also travel to parallel universes and propagate this most important gift of creation, namely gift of life and gift of thinking across unchartered territories of parallel universes.
It would be only then that we might grasp a view of the truth prevailing the universe.

zero space time - FIGURE 1- ONE UNIVERSE - DR.Kambiz Afrasiabi​
FIGURE 1_ ONE UNIVERSE
zero space time - FIGURE 2_ BABY UNIVERSES INSIDE ONE UNIVERSE - DR.Kambiz Afrasiabi​
FIGURE 2_ BABY UNIVERSES INSIDE ONE UNIVERSE
FIGURE 3_ EXPANSION OF GALAXIES IN ONE UNIVERSE OR ONE BABY UNIVERSE - DR.Kambiz Afrasiabi​
FIGURE 3_ EXPANSION OF GALAXIES IN ONE UNIVERSE OR ONE BABY UNIVERSE
FIGURE 4_ BIG CRUNCH OF GALAXIES IN ONE UNIVERSE OR ONE BABY UNIVERSE FOLLOWING COLLISION WITH AFRASIABI INFINITY WALL OR WALLS - DR.Kambiz Afrasiabi​
FIGURE 4_ BIG CRUNCH OF GALAXIES IN ONE UNIVERSE OR ONE BABY UNIVERSE FOLLOWING COLLISION WITH AFRASIABI INFINITY WALL OR WALLS
FIGURE 5_ TREE OF UNIVERSES - DR.Kambiz Afrasiabi​
FIGURE 5_ TREE OF UNIVERSES
FIGURE 6_ ENDLESS FOREST OF UNIVERSES - DR.Kambiz Afrasiabi​
FIGURE 6_ ENDLESS FOREST OF UNIVERSES

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